Driving is a common activity that many Southern Californians do each day, and for some it is so routine that getting behind the wheel of their car may not even register as a potentially dangerous event. However, driving is a practice that takes skill and attention in order for an individual all others on the road with them to stay safe. Unfortunately, too many drivers operate their vehicles while compromised by alcohol, cell phones, and other distractions.

Like distracted driving, though, drowsy driving can also be a dangerous exercise for men and women who operate all forms of motor vehicles. A tired driver is less likely to respond to changes in road conditions and may not be prepared to react if a hazard presented itself before them. While drowsy driving is discouraged for all drivers, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) requires truck drivers to comply with hours of service regulations to ensure that they do not become sleepy behind the wheel.

Hours of service regulations apply to drivers of certain large trucks and passenger vehicles. They mandate that covered drivers take breaks from driving and how much sleep drivers must get before returning to their drivers’ seats. Recently, the government relaxed some hours of service mandates but many still exist to protect motorists from the perils of dangerous, drowsy truck drivers.

Any driver of a moving vehicle can cause tragic and deadly accidents when they are too tired to safely operate. The catastrophe that a large truck can inflict on victims can be unimaginable in scope. Individuals who suffer losses due to the negligent actions of truck drivers and trucking companies may have options to seek the recovery of their losses through personal injury litigation.